News and analysis from The Center for Michigan • http://thecenterformichigan.net
©2014 Bridge Michigan. All Rights Reserved. • Join us online at http://bridgemi.com

Original article URL: http://bridgemi.com/2013/09/whos-teaching-in-your-community/

Special report/Talent & education

Building a better teacher:

Who’s teaching in your community?

The age, experience, education and pay of teachers vary widely among school districts and charter schools. Look up your district or charter, and compare your teachers to the state average numbers you’ll find as the last item in your list.

12 comments from Bridge readers.Add mine!

  1. Jon Blakey

    Very interesting how few charter schools are reporting their teacher wages. I know this has to do with the fact that many are managed by private companies but it is troubling that they are not required to report these numbers.

  2. Jon Blakey

    It would also be interesting to see a scatter plot that looks at the relationship of average teacher salaries compared to poverty rates and to the top-to-bottom school rankings created by the department of education.

  3. DJ

    Wow, I was there for 11 years and I was making not even half of the MI teacher salary reported. Is something wrong with this site?

  4. Ron

    Who gathered all this data and has it been validated. I am assuming all the income averages are just wages.

  5. Lynne

    I’m interested in learning how many teachers are majors in the subjects they teach in grades 7-12.
    Would also like to know the colleges who prepared these teachers.
    Also troubled that charter schools do not publicize their salary data. They are spending the public’s money and the public has a right to know all aspects of their operations.

    1. ann

      Lynn, I agree with you completely in relation to charter schools wanting to act as public schools with their hands out for our tax money, but don’t want to be transparent with what they do with that money. Making charter school teacher salaries public should be demanded just as they are for traditional public schools. These for profit charter schools need more public scrutiny than what they have been getting away with.

    2. Orchidlover

      I believe it’s controlled via the teacher certification process.

      http://education.msu.edu/academics/undergraduate/mttc.asp

      So the answer is yes, they must either major or minor in the subject area in which they teach.

  6. Jerry

    I would like to know how they define teachers. I would like it to mean “regular Classroom Teachers”, not aids, speech therapists, administrators, and all the other non-classroom personnel with teaching degrees.

    How does this study define “Teachers” ?

  7. Jennifer Kangas

    The Bridge Report that was distributed January, 2013 listed Michigan’s per pupil ratio at 18:1 and an average salary of $57,958. Given the cuts that have occurred throughout the state, I find it difficult to believe that salaries have actually gone up by $5 thousand per teacher. Was the data confirmed?

  8. Rick f

    These figures seem to include total costs, such as wages, benefits, FICA etc. Note the few number of districts with a high percentage of teachers with advanced degrees. You can tell where professional teaching is encouraged. Salaries on the high end are mostly in areas that get more than the 7600 student foundation amount. By not reporting charter schools payroll it makes it look like the averages are a lot higher than they are.

  9. BK

    I would like a definition of who this includes for teacher. Are benefits included in all schools data? Are the cuts in benefits and salary that have taken place included or is this before the cuts? Charter school data should include same data as public. If administrators are included with teachers their salaries should be included and so should Charter Schools. Who confirmed the data?

  10. John

    I teach t at charter school. Not only is the headcount of students incorrect but also the age and number of years of service for the teachers. They don’t list the salaries because they pay very little.

Leave your comment...

Your email address will not be published.

Invest in non-partisan journalism.

Donate to The Center for Michigan. Find out why.