Ted Roelofs worked for the Grand Rapids Press for 30 years, where he covered everything from politics to social services to military affairs. He has earned numerous awards, including for work in Albania during the 1999 Kosovo refugee crisis.

Michigan tax facts, part 9: What will happen to your taxes in the future?

Ten years from now, will you be paying more, less, or the same amount of Michigan taxes that you pay today? Four experienced bean counters offer very different predictions.

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Michigan tax facts, part 10: Sifting through fuzzy tax math on the campaign trail

Political candidates love to offer chickens in every pot. The specific recipes for how they’ll pay for their campaign promises are far more elusive. This year is no different on the Michigan campaign trail.

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Michigan tax facts, part 7: Will your city hall and local schools go bankrupt?

Local governments dodged a bullet with passage of the Proposal 1 tax reform in August. But many still aren’t secure. Do they need more money? Should they change how they do business? Or both?

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Michigan tax facts, part 8: What would Richard Headlee think today?

A generation ago, an insurance executive fashioned himself a role as the defender of Michigan taxpayers. Voters approved the Headlee Amendment, which placed a ceiling on the growth of government. Today, Michigan government spending is billions of dollars under the cap Richard Headlee fought for.

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Michigan tax facts, part 6: How much do taxes matter for business location?

Voters often get wooed by campaign promises of tax cuts to improve the economy and attract business. Are there results behind the sound bites?

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Special report: 10 things every voter should know about Michigan taxes

The tools you need to provide your own fact-driven answer to that question.

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Michigan tax facts, part 2: Who wants what in the long war over taxes

Wildly different views of the future drive the ongoing intellectual war over tax policy in Michigan.

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Robots enter Flint, change lives

New robotics center at Flint’s Kettering University opens doors for minority students.

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How robotics changed one girl’s path

Flint Hamady High School student De’Shondria Bedenfield went from quiet student to champ with a milling machine after becoming hooked by robotics.

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Free speech goes begging in Grand Rapids

Across Michigan, communities are trying to craft restrictions on panhandling that don’t run afoul of First Amendment protections.

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A day on the streets with a young panhandler

The story behind one man’s sign.

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A Republican civil war plays out in Michigan

Michigan GOP primary foes wage a battle of ideas and tone, echoing similar struggles within the party in Washington and elsewhere.

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A primer for a primary with national themes

Close races, marijuana referendums, a southeast Michigan mass transit tax proposal and a statewide business tax issue highlight the Aug. 5 ballot.

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Help Wanted: Yes, there really are 70,000 good jobs open

Well-paying jobs in manufacturing, health care and engineering are plentiful in Michigan, but our high school grads still lack the goods to grab them. Experts urge more focus on raising math and problem-solving skills.

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Obamacare booms in Michigan, but wide differences in policy rates raise new questions

After a disastrous launch, Michigan residents are flocking to the Affordable Care Act. Yet the rates all those newly insured vary widely depending on where you live. A lack of competition in some local markets raises questions on why the same kinds of coverage have such different price tags across the state.

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Medicaid expansion widens safety net, but are future costs a ticking time bomb?

Nearly 270,000 low-income Michigan residents signed up for expanded Medicaid in less than two months. While officials project that number to explode, critics fear the program will prove too costly to sustain.

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Is Michigan wasting 20,000 teen lives – and at great expense?

Michigan is among a dwindling number of states that prosecute 17-year-olds as adults, even though teens are more likely to commit more crimes when placed with adults. Most teens prosecuted as adults committed nonviolent crimes.

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How one county keeps troubled teens out of prison

Innovative programs in Berrien County are going to teens’ homes, not waiting for teens to find trouble. The result: recidivism is down sharply.

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