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Poverty in Paradise

Lindy VanSickle, 23, and her 4-year-old son, DeWayne, rely on food they get from an Emmet County food pantry. (Bridge photo by John Russell)

Lindy VanSickle, 23, and her 4-year-old son, DeWayne, rely on food they get from an Emmet County food pantry. (Bridge photo by John Russell)

On the shores of two Great Lakes, two Michigans are pulling away from one another. For one, graceful summer homes rise on waterfronts, equipped with boats, tubes and toys. For the other, life is lived in trailers on back roads, or small houses tucked into the woods. One comes north in May and enjoys a summer of festivals, fun and restaurant dining. The other Michigan lives here year-round and waits tables or changes hotel beds. One is, like the state at large, recovering from the recession and building wealth. The other slips deeper into, or closer to, poverty.

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